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Indiana State University    
 
    
 
  Aug 23, 2017
 
2017-2018 Academic BLUEprint

Academics


Click on the following links for information:


What is a major?

A major is the primary discipline or field that is part of a degree program. Majors generally consist of 31-80 credits from a specified group of courses. Majors are displayed on a student’s transcript.

What is a minor?

A minor is a secondary discipline or field that is completed as part of a degree program. Minors generally range from 15-29 credits. Completed minors are displayed on a student’s transcript.

What is a concentration?

A concentration is a set of courses (a minimum of 9 credits) within a major that allows a student to focus on a particular area within, or closely related to, the major. Completed concentrations are shown on a student’s transcript.

*Students should initiate a change of major/minor/concentration through the college of their current major. Additional information can be found online here.

Academic Standing

Academic Standing Requirements for Continued Enrollment (Undergrad)
  • Good Standing. A student must maintain a C (2.0) cumulative grade point average to be considered in good academic standing by the University.

  • Academic Probation. If a student’s cumulative grade point average is less than 2.0, the student will be placed on academic probation. Students on academic probation will not be permitted to take more than 13 credit hours. Students on academic probation will be assigned mid-term grades so they are aware of possible academic difficulties early in the semester. Students who are on academic probation are strongly encouraged to repeat courses in which “F” or “WF” grades were received during the next semester (or the next time the course is offered).

  • Academic Dismissal. Students who meet the following criteria will be academically dismissed unless exception is provided by the dean of the relevant college on a case-by-case basis:

    It should be pointed out that some programs may have requirements above the minimum University retention standards.

    • First-term students who earn a term grade point average of less than 0.85;

    • Freshmen who are on probation and earn a term grade point average of 1.7 or less;

    • Sophomores who are on probation and earn a term grade point average less than 2.0;

    • Juniors and seniors who are on probation and earn a term grade point average less than 2.2.

Students who have been academically dismissed should expect to stay out of classes for one academic semester (following a first dismissal) and one academic year (following a second dismissal), after which such students should petition their academic dean to return to classes. Deans will retain the discretion to provide exception to NOT academically dismiss on a case-by-case basis. No student may return to classes after a third academic dismissal. Students needing to be readmitted after an academic dismissal should complete an application for re-admission

Academic Standing Requirements for Continued Enrollment (Graduate)

A graduate student whose grade point average drops below a 3.0 (3.25 or 3.5 in certain programs) will be placed on probation, suspended from graduate study, or dismissed from the College of Graduate and Professional Studies. The dean of the College of Graduate and Professional Studies, in accordance with the regulations of the student’s academic department and the College of Graduate and Professional Studies, will make decisions in such matters.

Students who have been academically dismissed should expect to stay out of classes for one academic semester (following a first dismissal) and one academic year (following a second dismissal), after which such students should petition their academic dean to return to classes. No student may return to classes after a third academic dismissal.

A student who is suspended from graduate study or dismissed from the College of Graduate and Professional Studies may request a review of the case by the Graduate Student Appeals Committee of the Graduate Council.

Course Repeats

You may repeat an undergraduate course for grade point average (GPA) improvement. The highest grade becomes the official grade for the course. Your remaining grades will remain on your transcript but will not count in the GPA or total of credits. Graduate level courses CANNOT be repeated for grade point average (GPA) improvement.   Please be advised that federal regulations may prohibit students from receiving financial aid for repeating coursework. A student who has already taken a course and has questions whether financial aid will cover a repeat should contact the Office of Student Financial Aid.

Final Exam Schedule

The final exam schedule is for all full-semester classes which meet at the times listed, including distance education courses. All classes are scheduled to take final exams during final exam week, including distance education courses. During summer, final examinations are on the last scheduled class day. The final exam schedules for fall and spring are listed below.

Fall 2017 Final Exam Schedule  

Spring 2018 Final Exam Schedule  

Study Week Policy

Study Week is intended to encourage student preparation for final examinations given during the final examination week. Class attendance, however, is still expected.  No examination of any kind, including quizzes that count over four percent of the grade, can be given during Study Week.  Papers due during Study Week must be specified in the class syllabus handed out to students at the beginning of each semester.  Examinations for laboratory; intensive, mini-courses; or summer sessions are permitted.

The student is responsible for notifying the Student Government Association of a violation of any of the above terms. The Student Government Association will take the correct procedures for informing the faculty member and the academic department chairperson of the failure to comply with the terms of the Study Week policy.  The student’s name will be confidential to the Student Government Association.

Requisite Information

Many courses have mandatory prerequisites or co-requisites listed in the academic catalog or in the Dynamic Schedule of Classes.  Each student is responsible for meeting the published prerequisites or co-requisites for each registered course.  After each registration and grading period, colleges, schools, and departments may review the completion of prerequisites and co-requisites of registered students.  The academic units have the authority to administratively drop a student from a course for which the student has not fulfilled the published prerequisites or co-requisites.

If you experience registration errors, this would indicate that you are attempting to register for a course in which you have not met the approved prerequisites, co-requisites, or class restrictions.  For a guide to determine the various error messages and proper corrective action, visit Student Resources on the Office of Registration and Records webpage.



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